South African Brands and Products

“What is that?” you ask. While it may be familiar to any South African, or even anybody who has been to South Africa, the rest of you may be at a complete loss. Don’t fear, help is here. Here’s a list of brands and products that have reached some level of iconic status in South Africa. Some of these products have become proprietary eponyms (a trademark or brand name that has become the generic name for, or synonymous with, a general class of product). One thing they all have in common is that every one of these products are used and loved by the people of South Africa. [List incomplete, and will be updated as brands and products feature on the rest of the website]

All Gold Tomato Sauce

All Gold Tomato Sauce

All Gold, South Africa’s most iconic tomato sauce launched was launched in 1908, when the unique recipe was brought to South Africa by Scottish chemist, John Semble, for production by H. Jones and Company, a jam manufacturing company in Paarl. From humble beginnings in the Western Cape, this well-loved product was originally manufactured by lowering muslin bags filled with herbs and spices into pots of ripe, freshly crushed tomatoes.

Chappies Bubblegum

Chappies Bubblegum

Chappies is a brand of bubblegum introduced in South-Africa in the late 1940s. Chappies was created by Arthur Ginsburg while working for Chapelat, a Johannesburg based confectionery manufacturer, as a competitor for the well established Wicks bubblegum. The innovations of Arthur Ginsburg launched the Chappies brand into a position where the name Chappies became synonymous with the word bubblegum. The first innovation was the business model. While the Wicks branded gum was sold for 1c per piece, the smaller Chappies gum was sold at 1c for two pieces. This led to Chappies gaining value as currency as shopkeepers would give change in the form of gum. The second innovation was the inclusion of “Did you know” trivia on the inside of the wrappers, which were often collected by kids. The mascot is called Chappies Chipmunk.

Joko Tea

Joko Tea

The master-blenders at Joko select only “One in a Thousand leaves” to provide that strong sip in every cup.   Joko understands that there is a lot to pack in a day.  Sometimes it is essential to take a step back, have a cup of Joko and find your inner strength. Joko Tea dates back to the 1890s and Frederick Glenton, in Johannesburg, who borrowed 1 000 pounds form his brother in Ireland to buy and market high quality Ceylon Tea. The wagon first used for distribution was drawn by two horses – Jo and Ko.

Lion Matches

Lion Matches

Welcomed in households across South Africa, Lion Safety Matches enjoy a reputation founded on quality and reliability that has made them a “box of friends” to families for over a hundred years (Since 1905).

.

.

.

Oros Orange Squash

Oros Orange Squash

The Oros brand was founded in 1899 by Charles Brookes, and family fun time changed forever. Although the idea of Oros immediately conjures up the distinctive orange taste, the first flavour in the range was actually Lemos. But South Africa spoke, their preference for orange was heard and “the original orange squash” was developed. Over the years several other flavours were added.

.

.

.

Purity Baby Food

Purity Baby Food

Purity has been helping busy mums for over six decades, ever since a Capetonian Doctor developed the first commercially prepared baby food in South Africa, with the help of his wife, a dietician, and cousin, a chemist. Manufactured by Tiger Brands, Purity has become synonymous with baby food, and has been immortalised in the Koos Kombuis song “Katie”.

.

Rooibos Tea

Rooibos Tea

If it’s not grown in the Cedar Valley of the Western Cape, it’s not Rooibos. By law, that is. Like Champagne from France or Tequila from Mexico, rooibos has been granted geographical indicator status, so nobody can trademark the name, or called it rooibos if it’s not grown in the Cape. Besides, it doesn’t grow so good anywhere else anyway. A very popular drink in South Africa, it’s also one of the healthiest teas around. The rooibos plant is a broom-like member of the legume family of plants growing in South Africa’s fynbos. Rooibos literally translates to “red bush”, but anyone who refers to it as red bush tea should be shunned and treated as a degenerate. That’s an order.

Simba Chips

Simba Chips

Simba is a popular potato chip manufacturer and has been producing its products in South Africa since 1956, when it was established by the Greyvenstein family, of Ouma Rusks fame. The chip is known for its mascot, Simba the Lion, as well as the annoyingly catchy advertising song, “I want to be a Simba chippie”.

.

.

Zam-Buk Ointment

Zam-Buk Ointment

Zam-Buk is a traditional embrocating balm with many uses.  For generations around the world, people have used Zam-Buk to soothe cuts, wounds, bruises, sores, scalds, athlete’s foot, pimples, ulcers, eczema, burns, insect bites and much more. Now produced by Rose & Co. Apothecary, Zam-Buk was originally manufactured by Fison Limited in Leeds, Yorkshire in the early 1900s. Zam-Buk is a green opaque natural ointment, with the consistency of Vaseline, and a distinct scent. Made from primarily eucalyptus oil, camphor and thyme oil, and is an anti-microbal with mild analgesic properties.

Advertisements

5 responses to “South African Brands and Products

  1. Pingback: Sorina “Die Flooze” Erasmus Admitted to Hospital with Ebola | Banana Newsline

  2. Pingback: Rubber Bullets Fired as Pupils Invade School in Limpopo | Banana Newsline

  3. South African Brands and Products | Banana Newsline

    Like

  4. Pingback: Pistorius Vomit Caused by Buffet Breakfast | Banana Newsline

  5. Pingback: Quinton de Kock Allowed to Play without Diaper | Banana Newsline

The opinions on Banana Newsline, even the opinions expressed by Banana Newsline, are not the opinions of Banana Newsline. Enter your opinion below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s